The Italian Job (2003): A Classic Heist Film

The Italian Job
The Italian Job

The Italian Job (2003) is a heist action film directed by F. Gary Gray and starring a star-studded cast including Mark Wahlberg, Charlize Theron, Edward Norton, Jason Statham, Seth Green, Mos Def, and Donald Sutherland. The film was a remake of the original 1969 British film of the same name and was released on May 30, 2003, in the United States.

The Italian Job
The Italian Job

The plot of the film revolves around a team of thieves led by Charlie Croker (Mark Wahlberg), who plan an elaborate gold heist against their former ally Steve (Edward Norton) after he betrays them and leaves them for dead in Italy. The team consists of skilled drivers, hackers, and explosives experts who work together to pull off the heist and get their revenge. The film is known for its thrilling car chases, intricate plot, and memorable characters.

Key Takeaways

  • The Italian Job (2003) is a heist action film directed by F. Gary Gray and starring a star-studded cast including Mark Wahlberg, Charlize Theron, Edward Norton, Jason Statham, Seth Green, Mos Def, and Donald Sutherland.
  • The plot of the film revolves around a team of thieves led by Charlie Croker (Mark Wahlberg), who plan an elaborate gold heist against their former ally Steve (Edward Norton) after he betrays them and leaves them for dead in Italy.
  • The film is known for its thrilling car chases, intricate plot, and memorable characters.

Plot Summary

The Italian Job
The Italian Job

The Italian Job (2003) is a heist film directed by F. Gary Gray. The movie follows the story of Charlie Croker (Mark Wahlberg) and his team of thieves as they attempt to steal $35 million worth of gold bars from a former ally, Steve (Edward Norton), who betrayed them and left them for dead in Italy.

The movie begins with John Bridger (Donald Sutherland), a retired safecracker, calling his daughter Stella Bridger (Charlize Theron) to inform her that he will participate in his final heist. Bridger then meets up with Croker before setting the heist into motion. The team successfully steals the gold, but Steve double-crosses them, killing Bridger in the process and stealing the gold for himself.

The rest of the movie follows Croker and his team as they plan and execute a new heist to steal the gold back from Steve. They travel to Los Angeles, where they use their specialized skills to rig the city’s traffic lights and create a massive traffic jam to allow them to escape with the gold.

The Italian Job (2003) is a fast-paced and action-packed movie that keeps viewers on the edge of their seats. With a star-studded cast, including Wahlberg, Theron, Norton, and Sutherland, the movie is a must-see for fans of heist films and action movies.

Cast and Characters

Mark Wahlberg as Charlie Croker

Mark Wahlberg plays the lead role of Charlie Croker, a professional thief who plans and executes a gold heist against his former ally. Wahlberg’s portrayal of Croker is charismatic, confident, and resourceful. He brings a sense of humor to the character, making him a likable protagonist.

Charlize Theron as Stella Bridger

Charlize Theron plays the role of Stella Bridger, a safecracker and daughter of a legendary thief. Theron’s performance as Bridger is strong and confident, as she holds her own among the male-dominated ensemble cast. She brings a sense of vulnerability to the character, especially in her interactions with Croker.

Edward Norton as Steve Frezelli

Edward Norton plays the role of Steve Frezelli, a member of Croker’s team who double-crosses them and steals the gold. Norton’s performance as Frezelli is understated and subtle, as he portrays the character as a seemingly loyal member of the team until his betrayal is revealed.

Supporting Cast

The supporting cast includes Jason Statham as Handsome Rob, Mos Def as Left Ear, Seth Green as Lyle, and Donald Sutherland as John Bridger. Each actor brings their own unique style and personality to their respective roles, adding depth and humor to the ensemble cast.

Overall, the cast of The Italian Job (2003) delivers strong performances, each bringing their own unique style and personality to their respective roles. The chemistry between the cast members is evident, making the film an enjoyable heist movie with a likable cast of characters.

Production

Development

“The Italian Job” is a 2003 American heist action film directed by F. Gary Gray. The movie is a remake of the 1969 British film of the same name, which was directed by Peter Collinson. The remake was produced by Donald De Line and stars an ensemble cast consisting of Mark Wahlberg, Charlize Theron, Edward Norton, Jason Statham, Seth Green, Mos Def, and Donald Sutherland. The idea for the remake was first proposed in 1995 by De Line, who was inspired by the original film.

Filming Locations

The Italian Job was primarily filmed in Los Angeles, California, and Venice, Italy. Some of the filming locations in Los Angeles include the Los Angeles Convention Center, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, and the Sepulveda Dam. In Venice, the production crew filmed in Campo San Barnaba, a small square in the Dorsoduro district, and on the Grand Canal. The crew also shot scenes in Canazei, Trento, Trentino – Alto Adige, Italy.

Stunt Coordination

The stunt coordination for The Italian Job was handled by Spiro Razatos, who has worked on several other high-profile action films, including “The Fast and the Furious” franchise. Razatos worked closely with the actors to choreograph the film’s many car chases and stunts, which involved a fleet of Mini Coopers. The stunts were performed by a team of professional drivers, including rally drivers and stunt drivers, who were specially trained for the film. The stunts were filmed using a combination of practical effects and computer-generated imagery to create a seamless and thrilling action sequence.

Critical Reception

The Italian Job
The Italian Job

Box Office Performance

“The Italian Job” (2003) was a commercial success, grossing over $176 million worldwide against a production budget of $60 million. The film opened at number one in the United States and Canada, earning $19.5 million in its opening weekend. It went on to gross $106.1 million domestically and $70.7 million in international markets.

Critical Reviews

The film received mixed to positive reviews from critics. On Rotten Tomatoes, the film has a 73% approval rating based on 181 reviews, with an average rating of 6.6/10. The website’s critical consensus reads, “Despite some iffy plot elements, The Italian Job succeeds in delivering an entertaining modern take on the original 1969 heist film, thanks to a charismatic cast and outstanding car chases.”

Roger Ebert gave the film three out of four stars, praising the performances of the cast and the action sequences. He wrote, “The Italian Job is a slick, entertaining thriller by F. Gary Gray, and its cast has a good time with the material.” However, he criticized the film’s lack of character development and emotional depth.

Awards and Nominations

“The Italian Job” received no major awards or nominations, but it did receive a few minor nods. The film was nominated for Best Sound Editing at the 76th Academy Awards, but lost to “Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World.” It was also nominated for Best Special Effects at the BAFTA Awards, but lost to “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King.”

Soundtrack and Score

The Italian Job (2003) features a soundtrack and score that complement the action-packed heist film. The soundtrack includes songs from various artists, while the score was composed by John Powell.

The film’s opening credits feature the song “The Wreckoning” by Boomkat. Other notable songs in the soundtrack include “Money” by Scott Weiland, Slash, Duff McKagan, Matt Sorum, and Dave Kushner, and “ABC” by The Jackson 5. The soundtrack also includes songs by Kasabian, Nina Simone, and Massive Attack.

In addition to the soundtrack, the film’s score by John Powell adds to the tension and excitement of the film. Powell’s score features a mix of orchestral and electronic music, with themes that are both thrilling and emotional. Powell’s use of percussion and brass instruments adds to the film’s fast-paced action scenes, while the use of strings and piano in quieter moments adds depth to the characters and their relationships.

Overall, the soundtrack and score of The Italian Job (2003) enhance the film’s already thrilling heist story. The combination of popular songs and original score creates a memorable and exciting cinematic experience.

Influence and Legacy

The Italian Job
The Italian Job

The Italian Job (2003) has left a lasting legacy in Hollywood and beyond. The heist film has influenced many subsequent movies, particularly those in the action and thriller genres. One of the most notable aspects of The Italian Job’s legacy is its impact on car culture. The film features a number of high-performance vehicles, including a fleet of Mini Coopers, which have since become iconic in their own right.

The Italian Job’s influence can also be seen in the way it blends action, comedy, and suspense. The film’s witty one-liners and fast-paced action sequences have become a hallmark of the heist genre. Additionally, the film’s use of technology and gadgets has inspired many subsequent movies, particularly those in the spy and espionage genres.

The Italian Job (2003) has also had an impact on popular culture beyond the realm of film. The film’s iconic Mini Coopers have become a symbol of British cool, and have been featured in numerous advertisements and marketing campaigns. The film’s soundtrack, which features songs by artists like Quincy Jones and The Ordinary Boys, has also become a fan favorite.

Overall, The Italian Job (2003) has left a significant mark on Hollywood and popular culture. Its influence can be seen in the numerous films that have followed in its wake, as well as in the way that audiences continue to enjoy and appreciate the film today.

Home Media and Streaming Availability

The Italian Job
The Italian Job

The Italian Job (2003) is available to stream and purchase on multiple platforms. According to JustWatch, viewers can rent or buy the movie on Amazon Prime Video, Google Play, iTunes, Microsoft Store, Vudu, and YouTube. The rental price ranges from $2.99 to $3.99, while the purchase price ranges from $9.99 to $14.99, depending on the platform and video quality.

For those who prefer streaming, The Italian Job (2003) is also available on subscription-based streaming services such as Paramount+, fuboTV, and Philo. However, it is not currently available on popular streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, or Disney+.

It is worth noting that the availability of The Italian Job (2003) on each platform may vary by country and region. Viewers are advised to check the availability and pricing on their preferred platform before renting or purchasing the movie.

Overall, The Italian Job (2003) is widely available for home media and streaming, making it easy for viewers to enjoy the action-packed heist movie from the comfort of their own home.

Comparisons to Original 1969 Film

The 2003 version of The Italian Job is a remake of the 1969 classic, and as such, it is inevitable that comparisons will be made between the two films. While the two films share the same basic premise, there are a number of differences that set them apart.

One of the most obvious differences between the two films is the fact that the 2003 version is set in Los Angeles rather than in Italy. This change in location has a significant impact on the overall feel of the film, as the bright lights and fast pace of LA give the film a more modern, high-energy feel, while the original film had a more laid-back, European vibe.

Another major difference between the two films is the use of technology. The 2003 version features a number of high-tech gadgets and gizmos, including a remote-controlled helicopter and a computerized traffic control system. By contrast, the original film relied more on old-fashioned heist techniques, such as safecracking and lock picking.

Despite these differences, the 2003 version of The Italian Job remains faithful to the spirit of the original film. Both films feature a group of charming and charismatic thieves who are determined to pull off the perfect heist, and both films are filled with thrilling car chases and narrow escapes.

Overall, while the 2003 version of The Italian Job may not be quite as iconic as the original film, it is still an entertaining and enjoyable movie in its own right. Whether you are a fan of the original film or are just looking for a fun and exciting heist movie, The Italian Job (2003) is definitely worth checking out.

Frequently Asked Questions

The Italian Job
The Italian Job

Who were the main cast members of The Italian Job (2003)?

The main cast members of The Italian Job (2003) include Mark Wahlberg as Charlie Croker, Charlize Theron as Stella Bridger, Edward Norton as Steve, Jason Statham as Handsome Rob, Seth Green as Lyle, Mos Def as Left Ear, and Donald Sutherland as John Bridger.

The Italian Job (2003) is known for its impressive lineup of cars, including the iconic Mini Cooper S, Aston Martin DB7, and Lamborghini Murciélago.

Is there a prequel to The Italian Job (2003)?

No, there is no prequel to The Italian Job (2003).

How does The Italian Job (2003) compare to the original 1969 version?

The Italian Job (2003) is a remake of the 1969 British film of the same name. The 2003 version has a modern twist, with updated technology and a more diverse cast. While the basic plot remains the same, the 2003 version has more action and a faster pace.

Where can I watch The Italian Job (2003)?

The Italian Job (2003) is available to stream on Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. It can also be rented or purchased on YouTube, Google Play, iTunes, and Vudu.

Where was The Italian Job (2003) filmed?

The Italian Job (2003) was primarily filmed in Los Angeles, California, with additional scenes shot in Venice, Italy, and the Alps.

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